Children Witnesses in the Criminal Courts: Recognizing Competence and Assessing Credibility

Until the late 1980s, the justice system in Canada regarded children as inherently unreliable and their rare appearances in court were often extremely stressful. Since then, there have been dramatic changes in the awareness of child abuse and growing recognition that children can be highly reliable witnesses, if questioned appropriately.  There have been legal reforms […]

Authors:

Nicholas Bala
Nicholas Bala
Nicholas Bala is a Professor of Law at Queen's University. He is a leading international authority on legal issues related to families and children, including the role of children in the courts, high conflict separations and parental alienation, domestic violence and juvenile justice. Much of his research is interdisciplinary and collaborative.
 

The Youth Criminal Justice Act: An Overview

Young persons who commit crimes must be held accountable, but in Canada (as in most other western democracies), because of their age, we approach “youth crime” differently than how we approach crimes committed by adults. In keeping with international standards and scientific understanding, young persons – under the law, those between 12 and 18 years […]

Authors:

Charles Davison
Charles Davison is the Senior Criminal Defence Counsel with the Somba K’e office of the Legal Services Board in Yellowknife, NWT.
 

Voices of Children in Parenting Coordination

Parenting coordination is a form of alternative dispute resolution (“ADR”) targeting the needs of separated parents who are experiencing entrenched conflict and are having difficulty implementing court orders and parenting plans. Through different techniques such as negotiation, problem-solving, education, mediation, and – in some jurisdictions – decision enforcement, the goal of the parenting coordinator (“PC”) […]

Authors:

Catherine Quigley
Catherine Quigley, Phd is a lecturer at the Université de Montréal. She completed her Phd thesis in clinical psychology.
 

Francine Cyr
Francine Cyr, Phd is an adjunct professor at the Université de Montréal. Her research focuses on families in crisis, break-up or transition situations.
 

The State of Mental Health Treatment for Youth in the Justice System

Alberta’s youth criminal justice system is struggling to meet the demand for mental health treatment due to a lack of space in secure mental health treatment facilities. The youth criminal justice system would benefit from a more integrated approach to the administration of youth criminal justice services, the introduction of youth mental health courts, and […]

Authors:

Lisa Kasper
Lisa Kasper, B.A., B.N., J.D. is an articling student with the Alberta Civil Liberties Research Centre in Calgary, Alberta.
 

Finding the Best Ways Forward: Report on the Symposium on Children’s Participation in Justice Processes

In mid-September 2017, the Canadian Research Institute for Law and the Family and the Alberta Office of the Child and Youth Advocate (“OCYA”) hosted an innovative two-day national symposium on children’s participation in justice processes in Calgary, Alberta. The symposium brought together leading stakeholders from across Canada, including judges and lawyers, mental health professionals, and […]

Authors:

John-Paul Boyd
John-Paul Boyd
John-Paul Boyd presently serves as the director of the Canadian Research Institute for Law and the Family, prior to which he practiced family law in Vancouver for fourteen years.
 


A Publication of CPLEA