Obtaining Evidence in High Conflict Parenting Disputes, Part 3: Views of the Child Reports and Parenting Assessments

Print This Post Print This Post

In Part 1 of this series, Sarah Dargatz wrote about the use of children’s lawyers in high conflict family law disputes in Alberta. Sarah said that hiring a lawyer to represent a child can be an effective way to get information about the child’s views and preferences when the parents cannot agree. In Part 2, […]

New West Lands Reserve: Parts Unknown

Print This Post Print This Post

In 1763, after the Treaty of Paris, a map was published by, Robert Sayer: A New Map of North America, with the British, French, Spanish, Dutch & Danish Dominions on that great Continent; and the West India Islands, According to the Definitive Treaty concluded at Paris 10th February 1763 . It’s fascinating to look closely […]

Obtaining Evidence in High Conflict Parenting Disputes, Part 2: Using Experts in Parenting Disputes

Print This Post Print This Post

In most disputes over parenting time, parents come to reasonable decisions about what is in their child’s best interests.  However, a small percentage of disputes are “high conflict”.  In high conflict cases, the parents have great difficulty communicating, make decisions together, and treating each other with respect.  Each parent may advocate for very different schedules.  […]

Obtaining Evidence in High Conflict Parenting Disputes, Part 1: Lawyers for Children

Print This Post Print This Post

In most disputes over parenting time, parents come to reasonable decisions about what is in their child’s best interests. However, a small percentage of disputes are “high conflict”. In high conflict cases, the parents have great difficulty communicating, make decisions together, and treating each other with respect. Each parent will advocate for very different schedules. […]

Medical Care and Children: Law, Ethics and Emotions Collide

Print This Post Print This Post

While I imagine that being a judge is never easy, some situations and cases present more difficult decisions than others.  And I imagine that the most troubling rulings a judge must make are those which may be expected to lead directly to the death of another person.  While Canada does not have the death penalty […]


A Publication of CPLEA