Blog relating law to life

New at CPLEA (Vol 44-6)

In this issue of LawNow, we are highlighting new and updated resources for landlords and tenants. New Resources We have prepared the following sample agreements in a fillable PDF format: Living with Your Landlord If you are living with your landlord (as in sharing space with them), this fillable agreement includes terms you can use […]

Authors:

Lesley Conley
Lesley Conley
Lesley Conley is a Project Coordinator with the Centre for Public Legal Education Alberta.
 

The Use of the Peace, Order and Good Government Clause in Canada’s Constitution

Recent events in Canada have caused a resurgence of reliance on the Peace, Order and Good Government (POGG) clause in section 91 of The Constitution Act, 1867. When federal and provincial governments seek to pass legislation, they must have authority under section 91 (federal government) or 92 (provincial governments). These sections list subject matters that […]

Authors:

Linda McKay-Panos
Linda McKay-Panos, BEd, JD, LLM, is the Executive Director of the Alberta Civil Liberties Research Centre in Calgary, Alberta.
 

Working from Home: Income tax issues

During the COVID-19 pandemic, many employees transitioned to working from home. During the crisis, few were considering the income tax implications. As life returns to whatever the “new normal” is, we can be confident taxes will still exist. So what are the tax implications of a workspace in the home? Deducting home office expenses In […]

Authors:

Joseph Devaney
Joseph Devaney
Joseph Devaney, CPA, CA, is a member of the editorial board of Video Tax News in Edmonton, Alberta.
 

Hugh Neilson
Hugh Neilson
Hugh Neilson, FCPA, FCA, TEP, is an independent contractor with Kingston Ross Pasnak LLP, and a member of the Video Tax News editorial board in Edmonton, Alberta.
 

The Rise of the Digital Robber Barons: Is government up to the task at hand?

Given Canada’s history, we can anticipate that any plans for the federal government to use its “super powers” could erode our civil liberties. We must vigilantly protect fundamental rights and look to the courts to affirm, and in some instances extend, the reach of our Charter protections should government threaten our rights. However, in this […]

Authors:

Rob Normey
Rob Normey is a lawyer who has practised in Edmonton for many years and is a long-standing member of several human rights organizations.
 

BENCHPRESS | Sentencing, Supervising and Schooling

Systemic Racism in Sentencing R v Kandhai, 2020 ONSC 3580 Mr. Kandhai was charged with and pled guilty to one count of possession of a prohibited firearm with accessible ammunition and one count of a breach of a firearms prohibition order. At the sentencing hearing, the defence asked for 3 years while the Crown requested […]

Authors:

Jessica Steingard
Jessica Steingard
Jessica Steingard, BCom, JD, is a staff lawyer at the Centre for Public Legal Education Alberta.
 

The Right to Housing as a Human Right

International human rights law acknowledges everyone’s right to an adequate standard of living, which includes the right to adequate housing. Many international legal instruments protect the right to adequate housing, including: the Universal Declaration of Human Rights (Article 25); the International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights (Article 11); the Convention on the Rights […]

Authors:

Myrna El Fakhry Tuttle
Myrna El Fakhry Tuttle, JD, MA, LLM, is the Research Associate at the Alberta Civil Liberties Research Centre in Calgary, Alberta.
 

The Emergencies Act

When I agreed to write about the Emergencies Act, I had no idea that I would end up doing so at a time when the federal government was actually considering resorting to this never-before-used legislation. But with the arrival and spread of COVID-19 in Canada, this Act is an option the government has considered. While […]

Authors:

Charles Davison
Charles Davison is the Senior Criminal Defence Counsel with the Somba K’e office of the Legal Services Board in Yellowknife, N.W.T.
 

Charter Notwithstanding: Section 33

33 (1) Parliament or the legislature of a province may expressly declare in an Act of Parliament or of the legislature, as the case may be, that the Act or a provision thereof shall operate notwithstanding a provision included in section 2 or sections 7 to 15 of this Charter. Section 33 of the Canadian […]

Authors:

Peter Bowal
Peter Bowal
Peter Bowal is a Professor of Law at the Haskayne School of Business, University of Calgary in Calgary, Alberta.
 

Carter Czaikowski
Carter Czaikowski is a student at the Haskayne School of Business at the University of Calgary.
 

Josh Zablocki
Josh Zablocki is a student at the Haskayne School of Business at the University of Calgary.
 

FAMILY | What COVID-19 Caselaw Tells Us about Parenting

This column is coming out during the COVID-19 pandemic. Health authorities across Canada, and the world, have issued protocols for limiting the spread of the virus. Many family courts are only hearing “urgent” matters. The court has heard cases during this time that speak to a specific set of circumstances in our history. However, the […]

Authors:

Sarah Dargatz
Sarah Dargatz
Sarah Dargatz has been practicing family law since 2009. She is currently a partner at Latitude Family Law LLP.
 

CRIMINAL | There is no Monopoly Man and COVID-19 is Not a Get out of Jail Free Card

Why the public needs to relax their fear of violent criminals being needlessly freed Amidst the COVID-19 pandemic, there has been public query and fear (and at times outrage) over whether or not the COVID-19 pandemic allows violent criminals to roam free on our streets. Salacious and tantalizing commentary has sparked public debate over whether […]

Authors:

Melody Izadi
Melody is a criminal defence lawyer with the firm Caramanna Friedberg LLP, located in Toronto, Ontario.
 


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