Blog relating law to life

Alternatives to Court: Arbitration

In our first column in this series, I introduced the basic alternatives to resolving family law disputes in court – negotiation, mediation and arbitration – and talked about some of the surprising research on lawyers’ views about litigation. In the second column, Sarah Dargatz wrote about collaborative negotiation, a cooperative kind of negotiation in which […]

Authors:

John-Paul Boyd
John-Paul Boyd
John-Paul E. Boyd is a family law arbitrator and mediator, working in Alberta and British Columbia, and is the former executive of the Canadian Research Institute for Law and the Family.
 

R v Reeves: Shared Computer? Don’t Fret—Your Secrets are Safe

People share things. They share rooms, apartments, and wi-fi passwords. They share socks, Netflix accounts, and leftovers. But what does this sharing entail, exactly? As a shared owner, what rights do you actually have? Does shared ownership allow one to unilaterally decide what happens to the shared object or thing? In R v Reeves, 2018 […]

Authors:

Devon Kapoor
Devon Kapoor is a third-year JD/MBA student at Osgoode Hall Law School in Toronto, Ontario.
 

New & Updated Resources at CPLEA – Vol. 43-4

All resources are free and available for download on cplea.ca. We hope that this will raise awareness of the many resources that CPLEA produces to further our commitment to public legal education in Alberta. For a listing of all CPLEA resources go to: www.cplea.ca/publications In this issue of LawNow we are highlighting four updated publications […]

Authors:

Lesley Conley
Lesley Conley
Lesley Conley is a Project Coordinator with the Centre for Public Legal Education Alberta.
 

BenchPress – Vol 43-4

A series of cases decided in January 2019 highlight the ongoing problems with solitary confinement within Canada’s corrections system. The British Columbia Court of Appeal ruled on a challenge filed by the John Howard Society and the B.C. Civil Liberties Association against the Attorney General of Canada on the issue of inmate segregation. The Court […]

Authors:

Teresa Mitchell
Teresa Mitchell
Teresa Mitchell is the Acting Editor and Legal Writer for LawNow Magazine at the Centre for Public Legal Education Alberta. www.cplea.ca
 

Convicted on Sexism: How does sexist reasoning in favour of the complainant work in today’s #metoo culture?

In R. v. J.L. 2018 ONCA 756, The Ontario Court of Appeal allowed the appeal of an accused who was convicted of sexual assault. The trial judge convicted the accused because he felt that the complainant would not engage in the acts as described by the accused because she was a young woman. The alleged […]

Authors:

Melody Izadi
Melody is a criminal defence lawyer with the firm Caramanna Friedberg LLP, located in Toronto, Ontario.
 

Important Concepts in Environmental Law – “Polluter Pays”

Your parents may have told you: “If you make a mess, you have to clean it up.” In a nutshell, that is the basis of the “polluter pays” principle.  There is a lot wrapped up inside the simple principle of polluter pays.  The roots of the principle come from economics rather than from environmentalism. The […]

Authors:

Jeff Surtees
Jeff Surtees
Jeff Surtees B.Comm., JD, LLM is the Executive Director of the Centre for Public Legal Education Alberta.
 

Human Rights and Extradition

Recently, extradition has been front and centre in our news cycle (see: CBC, January 22, 2019 “China accuses U.S., Canada of abusing extradition in Huawei case”). There are very important human rights aspects to the process of extradition. These are critical to our democracy and the rule of law. For example, if another nation involved […]

Authors:

Linda McKay-Panos
Linda McKay-Panos, BEd. JD, LLM is the Executive Director of the Alberta Civil Liberties Research Centre in Calgary, Alberta.
 

Charities’ Political Activities Question Quieted, If Not Fully Resolved

The long tumult over registered charities’ role in public policy debate appears on the cusp of being resolved, or at least being significantly quieted, in the wake of three recent developments. First, in December, the federal government enacted legislation to amend the Income Tax Act (ITA) in response to a July 2018 Ontario Superior Court […]

Authors:

Peter Broder
Peter Broder is Policy Analyst and General Counsel at The Muttart Foundation in Edmonton, Alberta. The views expressed do not necessarily reflect those of the Foundation.
 

Believe It or Not Tenancy Questions

Here at CPLEA, we receive hundreds of questions about landlord and tenant issues every year. While a majority of them are relatively straightforward, we occasionally receive some questions that leave us scratching our heads or in a state of disbelief (or sometimes a bit of both). In this article, we’ve compiled answers to some of […]

Authors:

Judy Feng
Judy Feng
Judy Feng, BCom, JD, is a staff lawyer at the Centre for Public Legal Education Alberta. The views expressed do not necessarily reflect those of the Centre.
 

What is ‘Self-Dealing’ in Employment?

Introduction While they have human bosses, most employees work for corporations, which are legal fictions with no physical existence. That renders employers technically vulnerable to their own employees who might want to take advantage of them. It is both impossible and undesirable to scrutinize every employee during every minute on the job. There are many […]

Authors:

Peter Bowal
Peter Bowal
Peter Bowal is a Professor of Law at the Haskayne School of Business, University of Calgary in Calgary, Alberta.
 

Malhar Shahani
Malhar Shahani is a student at the Haskayne School of Business.
 


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