Blog relating law to life

New & Updated Resources at CPLEA – Vol. 43-5

All resources are free and available for download on cplea.ca. We hope that this will raise awareness of the many resources that CPLEA produces to further our commitment to public legal education in Alberta. For a listing of all CPLEA resources go to: www.cplea.ca/publications In this issue of LawNow we are highlighting four updated publications […]

Authors:

Lesley Conley
Lesley Conley
Lesley Conley is a Project Coordinator with the Centre for Public Legal Education Alberta.
 

Alternatives to Court: Mediation

In the first column in this series, John-Paul Boyd introduced basic alternatives to resolving family law disputes in court. In the second column, I wrote about the Collaborative process. In the last issue, John-Paul Boyd explained arbitration. In this column, I’m going to talk about mediation. Mediation is a process where you and the other […]

Authors:

Sarah Dargatz
Sarah Dargatz
Sarah Dargatz has been practicing family law since 2009. She is currently a partner at Latitude Family Law LLP.
 

State Neutrality Does Not Always Result in Substantive Equality

Recently, Quebec Premier François Legault’s government introduced Bill 21 (An Act Respecting the Laicity [Secularism] of the State). Among other things, the Act prohibits public workers in positions of authority (e.g., teachers, police officers, prison guards, Crown prosecutors, government lawyers and judges) from wearing religious symbols (not defined in the Act, but presumably would include […]

Authors:

Linda McKay-Panos
Linda McKay-Panos, BEd. JD, LLM is the Executive Director of the Alberta Civil Liberties Research Centre in Calgary, Alberta.
 

Alberta Election Legislation and Charities

After years of turmoil around the topic, the federal government moved recently to reform treatment of charities’ “public policy dialogue and development activities”. The reform was, at least in part, in response to the striking down as unconstitutional of certain provisions of the Income Tax Act dealing with registered charities’ political activities. In a 2018 […]

Authors:

Peter Broder
Peter Broder is Policy Analyst and General Counsel at The Muttart Foundation in Edmonton, Alberta. The views expressed do not necessarily reflect those of the Foundation.
 

To Stop or not To Stop? Police Carding Practices

In R. v. Omar, 2018 ONCA 975 (CanLII), the Ontario Court of Appeal has rubber stamped the illegality of what is commonly referred to as carding, declaring that “[Everyone has] every right to be walking down the street unimpeded by the police” (at para 51). In a stunning decision where the Crown’s case rested solely […]

Authors:

Melody Izadi
Melody is a criminal defence lawyer with the firm Caramanna Friedberg LLP, located in Toronto, Ontario.
 

Accommodation in Tenancy: Assistance and Support Animals

Sometimes tenants require the assistance and support of an animal. Are landlords required to accommodate a tenant with an assistance or support animal? Well, part of the answer depends on the type of animal involved: does the situation involve a disabled tenant with a qualified service or guide dog, or is this some other type […]

Authors:

Judy Feng
Judy Feng
Judy Feng, BCom, JD, is a staff lawyer at the Centre for Public Legal Education Alberta. The views expressed do not necessarily reflect those of the Centre.
 

Political Belief and Discrimination in Employment Law

The Canadian Human Rights Act sets out prohibited grounds of discrimination under s. 3(1): For all purposes of this Act, the prohibited grounds of discrimination are race, national or ethnic origin, colour, religion, age, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity or expression, marital status, family status, genetic characteristics, disability and conviction for an offence for which […]

Authors:

Troy Hunter
Troy Hunter
Troy Hunter J.D. (Co-op Law) is an aboriginal lawyer. He owns and operates New Columbia Law Corporation in New Westminster, BC.
 

The Duty of Unions to Fairly Represent Their Members

Introduction: plight of the unionized worker The average unionized worker is in a weak position at work. In many workplaces he will, as a condition of employment, be required to join the existing union. Or he may have been out-voted in the decision to unionize. Bringing serious concerns and directly accessing the employer is hampered […]

Authors:

Peter Bowal
Peter Bowal
Peter Bowal is a Professor of Law at the Haskayne School of Business, University of Calgary in Calgary, Alberta.
 

Building the New Jerusalem, One Clause at a Time

The Saskatchewan Bill of Rights, 1947, was landmark legislation that inaugurated a new era in Canadian law. The Bill, which contained a clear description of the rights and freedoms to be protected by the provincial government, anticipated the much better known document of the United Nations, which was declared a year after this bill of […]

Authors:

Rob Normey
Rob Normey is a lawyer who has practised in Edmonton for many years and is a long-standing member of several human rights organizations.
 

Moving Toward a New and Improved Senate

The following is the summary of a study completed by Paul G. Thomas on the Senate of Canada. The Senate of Canada has changed significantly as a result of the 2014 decision by Justin Trudeau, then leader of the Liberal party, to remove Liberal senators from the parliamentary caucus; and by his introduction, as prime […]

Authors:

Paul G. Thomas
Paul G. Thomas is professor emeritus of political studies at the University of Manitoba.
 


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