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the-top-court

Canada’s top court is a cornerstone of our Parliamentary democracy and the Rule of Law.  It has shaped our nation since 1875.

Volume 39-6 – July/August 2015

Table of Contents


Featured Articles: The Top Court

Special Report: Self Represented-Litigants

Columns

Featured Articles: The Top Court

Democratic Governance: The Constitution and Canada’s Branches of Government
Lorraine Snyder and Dustin Martin

In order to understand the role of Canada’s top court, it is necessary to understand how it fits within our Constitution.

The Supreme Court of Canada: A History
Hugo Vaillancourt

Canada’s top court has seen many changes since it was first created in 1875.

Judicial Review is Different from Judicial Activism
Charles Davison

Our judges have a duty to review the legitimacy of laws and strike them down if they are contrary to the Constitution.

The Nadon Reference: A Unique Challenge
John Edmond

The recent Reference re Supreme Court Act concerning nominated Justice Marc Nadon was unprecedented in Canadian judicial history.

Top Courts in the U.S. and Canada: A Comparison
Peter Bowal and Jacqueline Bowal

Our top courts reflect each country’s cultural and political differences as our comprehensive chart outlines.

 

Special Report: Self-Represented Litigants

What Self–Represented Litigants (Actually) Want
Sarah Burton

Here’s a novel idea:  why don’t we ask self-represented litigants what would actually help them!

Small Claims Court: A Venue Made for Self-Represented Litigants
Peter Bowal and Jacqueline Bowal

This court is specifically set up to assist people who want to represent themselves.

The Vexatious Litigant
Trevor Todd and Judith Milliken, QC

Sometimes, self-represented litigants can abuse or misuse the court system so that sanctions are necessary.

 

 

A Publication of CPLEA