access to justice Archives - LawNow Magazine

The Right of an Imprisoned Accused to Conduct Online Research

Case Commented On: R v Biever, 2015 ABQB 301 The link between access to information and access to justice is not often discussed, but it is implicit in our legal process. Document production, questioning, and Crown disclosure are all premised on the notion that one needs access to relevant information in order to present one’s […]

Authors:

Sarah Burton
This article is reprinted with the permission of the Alberta Civil Liberties Research Centre. Sarah Burton was a staff lawyer with the Centre at the time this article was written.
 

Access to Justice: Potential Alternatives for Indigenous Peoples

About a year ago, there had been some publicity concerning Louie v. Louie BCCA, a court case where I acted as barrister and solicitor for an intervenor at the B.C. Court of Appeal. The case had involved a band member who sued his Chief and Council for a breach of fiduciary obligation. I was approached […]

Authors:

Troy Hunter
Troy Hunter
Troy Hunter J.D. (Co-op Law) is an aboriginal lawyer with Remedios & Company in Vancouver, BC.
 

Right to Counsel Includes Access to Counsel

Introduction The right to counsel upon arrest is a constitutionally protected right under section 10(b) of the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms. On July 18, 2014, the Supreme Court of Canada clarified the importance of this right in the case of R v Taylor (Taylor). In this case, the police did not provide an […]

Authors:

Lorraine Snyder
Lorraine Snyder is a law student at the University of Alberta.
 

What Self–Represented Litigants (Actually) Want

What should we do about self-represented litigants (SRLs)? Amid a backdrop of skyrocketing legal fees, decreased public funding, and a resultant wave of self-representation, this question seems to be on every reformer’s mind. Countless reports, working groups, and studies have asked this question, and reached diverse and creative conclusions. However, these papers often share one […]

Authors:

Sarah Burton
This article is reprinted with the permission of the Alberta Civil Liberties Research Centre. Sarah Burton was a staff lawyer with the Centre at the time this article was written.
 

Access to Justice in a post-SWUAV Courtroom

In September 2012, the Supreme Court of Canada significantly changed the law on public interest standing. It did so under the banner of advancing access to justice. After being released, Canada (AG) v Downtown Eastside Sex Workers United Against Violence, 2012 SCC 45 [SWUAV] received praise for making Charter litigation reachable to vulnerable groups who […]

Authors:

Sarah Burton
This article is reprinted with the permission of the Alberta Civil Liberties Research Centre. Sarah Burton was a staff lawyer with the Centre at the time this article was written.
 


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